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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24271

Title: Ultrastructural and Histochemical Characterization of the Zebra Mussel Adhesive Apparatus
Authors: Farsad, Nikrooz
Advisor: Sone, Eli D.
Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Keywords: Zebra Mussel
Dreissena polymorpha
byssus
ultrastructure
bioadhesive
adhesive
3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine
DOPA
TEM
transmission electron microscopy
bio-adhesive
catechol oxidase
immunogold labeling
histochemistry
histochemical methods
adhesive plaque
cryoultramicrotomy
TEM biological sample preparation
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Since their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in mid- to late-1980s, the freshwater zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, have colonized most lakes and waterways across eastern North America. Their rapid spread is partly attributed to their ability to tenaciously attach to hard substrates via an adhesive apparatus called the byssus, resulting in serious environmental and economic impacts. A detailed ultrastructural study of the bysuss revealed a 10 nm adhesive layer at the attachment interface. Distributions of the main adhesive amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and its oxidizing (cross-linking) enzyme, catechol oxidase, were determined histochemically. It was found that, upon aging, DOPA levels remained high in the portion of the byssus closest to the interface, consistent with an adhesive role. In contrast, reduced levels of DOPA corresponded well with high levels of catechol oxidase in the load-bearing component of the byssus, presumably forming cross-links and increasing the cohesive strength.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24271
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Materials Science & Engineering - Master theses

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