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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24273

Title: An Investigation of the Exocyst Complex and its role in Compatible Pollen-pistil Interactions in Arabidopsis
Authors: Haasen, Katrina Ellen
Advisor: Goring, Daphne
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: Exocyst Complex
Arabidopsis
Molecular signaling
Plant Reproduction
Pollen-Pistil Interactions
Compatibility
Self-Incompatibility
Exo70A1
Vesicle Trafficking
Docking Complexes
Brassica
Stigma
Papillae Cells
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Compatible interactions between male gametophytes (pollen) and the female reproductive organ (pistil) are essential for fertilization in flowering plants. Recognition at a molecular level allows “compatible” pollen grains to adhere/germinate on the stigma while pollen grains from unrelated plant species are largely ignored. The exocyst is a large eight subunit complex that is primarily involved in polarized secretion or regulated exocytosis in eukaryotic cells where it functions to tether vesicles to the plasma membrane. Recent research has implicated one of the Exo70 family members, Exo70A1, in compatible pollen-pistil interactions in Arabidopsis and Brassica. The loss of Exo70A1 in Arabidopsis Col-0 stigmas leads to the rejection of compatible pollen producing a “female sterile” phenotype. Through my research I have demonstrated that, driven by a stigma-specific promoter, an RFP:Exo70A1 fusion protein rescues this defect in exo70A1-1 mutant and Exo70A1 is found to be localized to the plasma membrane at flower opening.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24273
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

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