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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24274

Title: Automated Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Laser Scanning Cytometry
Authors: Wu, Eric
Advisor: Sun, Yu
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: microfluidics
laser scanning cytometry
automated
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a slide-based method that is used clinically for Quantitative Imaging Cytometry (QIC). A “Clatch” slide, named after the inventor, which is used in conjunction with the LSC for immunophenotyping patient cell samples, has several drawbacks. The slide requires time consuming and laborious pipette steps, making the slide prone to handling errors. The Clatch slide also uses a significant amount of cell sample, limiting the number of analyses for fine needle aspirate (FNA) samples. This thesis details an automated microfluidic system, composed of an embedded circuit, a plastic and polymer microfluidic device, and an aluminum frame, which can perform the same immunophenotyping procedures. This new system reduces the labor from 36 pipette steps to 8, it reduces the amount of cell sample from 180 μL to 56 μL, and it shortens the entire procedure from 75 minutes to 42 minutes.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24274
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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