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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24279

Title: Characterization of the Role of CXCL10 and CXCR3 in Breast Cancer
Authors: Raitman, Irene
Advisor: Andrulis, Irene
Department: Molecular and Medical Genetics
Keywords: Breast Cancer
Lymphocytic Infiltration
Chemokine
Basal
CXCL10
CXCR3
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Lymphocytic infiltration is a feature of basal breast cancer tumors. CXCL10 is a chemokine that was found expressed higher in basal tumor RNA compared to estrogen receptor positive tumor RNA. Both CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 were expressed in familial breast cancer tissues, a proportion of which have a basal phenotype. CXCL10 expression was associated with lymphocytic infiltration, and with CXCR3 expression. CXCL10 ligand and receptor were overexpressed individually or together in the human MCF7 cell line. Recombinant human CXCL10 was found to dose dependently decrease cell proliferation. CXCR3 and CXCL10-CXCR3 expressing cells had the potential for increased migration independent of CXCL10 concentration. Co-expression of both genes increased proMMP-2 levels, and conditioned media from one of these clones chemoattracted more of the CXCR3 clones, CXCL10-CXCR3 clones, and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. CXCL10 neutralization suggested that CXCL10 could play a role in this chemoattraction, though it is likely not the only factor involved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24279
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Molecular Genetics - Master theses

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