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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24281

Title: A Novel Biosensing Interface Preparation Method for ElectroMagnetic Piezoelectric Acoustic Sensor
Authors: Sheng, Jack
Advisor: Michael, Thompson
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: biosensor
self-assembling monolayer
EMPAS
thiolsulfonate
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Preliminary work towards the development of novel biosensing interfaces for EMPAS (ElectroMagnetic Piezoelectric Acoustic Sensor) is presented in this manuscript. This method involves the use of unprecedented thiosulfonate-based linkers to construct robust and durable SAMs (Self-Assembling Monolayer) onto piezoelectric quartz crystals, which can chemoselectively immobilize thiol-containing biomolecules under aqueous conditions in a single, straightforward, reliable and coupling-free manner. Initial efforts are devoted to the construction of SAMs and the subsequent immobilization of thiol-containing biomolecules, and then characterization by CAMs (Contact Angle Measurement) and ARXPS (Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). This method is then implemented into the construction of biosensing interfaces dedicated to the detection of avidin. With the incorporation of OEG (Oligo(Ethylene Glycol)) backbone and diluent in the method, 14-fold difference in signal response of EMPAS was observed between biotinylated and unfunctionalized SAMs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24281
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemistry - Master theses

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