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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24414

Title: Left/Right Asymmetries in a Multidimensional Universe: Citizens, Activists, and Parties
Authors: Cochrane, Christopher
Advisor: Nevitte, Neil
Department: Political Science
Keywords: Left/Right
Party Policy
Public Opinion
Political Competition
Canadian Party Politics
Issue Date: 29-Apr-2010
Abstract: Political scientists have sought to unify under a single theoretical umbrella the explanations for the patterns of public opinion in the electorate and the patterns of party policy. Yet, these models have not taken account of potential differences between left-wingers and right-wingers in the ways that policy preferences are bundled together across multiple dimensions of political disagreement. The dissertation examines the origins and structure of political opinions on three dimensions of left/right disagreement: wealth redistribution, social morality, and immigration. The overall argument is that the content and structure of opinions are fundamentally intertwined. As a result, left/right disagreement is multidimensional and asymmetrical. Left-wingers and right-wingers derive from different sources, and structure in different ways, their opinions about policy. These asymmetries appear in the patterns of public opinion, the preferences of party activists, and in the positioning of political parties.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24414
Appears in Collections:Doctoral
Department of Political Science - Doctoral theses

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