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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24467

Title: Nuclear Sharing and Nuclear Crises: A Study in Anglo-American Relations, 1957-1963
Authors: Cunningham, Jack
Advisor: Bothwell, Robert
Department: History
Keywords: Nuclear Nonproliferation
Issue Date: 8-Jun-2010
Abstract: Between 1957 and 1963, both Anglo-American discussions of nuclear cooperation and the wider debate on nuclear strategy within NATO were often dominated by the question of whether Britain’s deterrent would be amalgamated or integrated into a wider NATO or European force, such as the proposed MLF (Multilateral Force). This dissertation discusses the development and impact of competing British and American proposals for “nuclear sharing” within the context of European economic and political integration as well as that of discussions within NATO of the appropriate strategy for the alliance in an age of mutual nuclear vulnerability between the superpowers. Particular attention is paid to the context of successive nuclear crises in world politics during this period, from Sputnik to the Soviet ultimatum over Berlin through the Cuban missile crisis. The divergent opinions among the leaders of the major powers over the appropriate responses to these crises shaped the debate over nuclear sharing and form a previously neglected dimension of this topic.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24467
Appears in Collections:Doctoral
Department of History - Doctoral theses

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