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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24558

Title: The Role of Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in Regulating Cell Cycle Progression and the Expression of Fibronectin in the Human Placenta
Authors: Deda, Livia
Advisor: Caniggia, Isabella
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Placenta
Preeclampsia
Von-Hippel Lindau
Issue Date: 22-Jul-2010
Abstract: Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor protein classically known to target the α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) for proteasomal degradation. Emerging evidence has underscored a novel role for VHL in both cell cycle regulation and extracellular matrix assembly. Herein, we provide evidence of VHL multitasking in normal and pathological placentation. Using ex vivo, first trimester human placental tissue and in vitro, JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell line model we demonstrate that VHL plays a role in regulating the expression of cell cycle modulator CCND1 via a mechanism involving its inhibitor, p15 and HIF-2α. In addition, using a similar experimental strategy we provide evidence supporting a role for VHL in regulating the expression of fibronectin and its receptor integrin α5. Moreover, altered VHL expression observed in preeclampsia is associated with altered expression of cell cycle regulators and contributes to altered FN protein levels which are characteristic of this pathology.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24558
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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