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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24588

Title: Protein-protein Interaction Between Two Key Regulators of One-carbon Metabolism in Saccaharomyces cerevisiae.
Authors: Khan, Aftab
Advisor: Bognar, Andrew
Department: Molecular and Medical Genetics
Keywords: One-Carbon Metabolism
Gene Regulation
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: One-carbon metabolism is an essential process that is conserved from yeast to humans. Glycine stimulates the expression of genes in one-carbon metabolism, whereas its withdrawal causes repression of these genes. The transcription factor Bas1p and the metabolic enzyme Shm2p have been implicated in this regulation. I have shown that Bas1p physically interacts with Shm2p through co-immunoprecipitation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), I have also shown that the interaction between Bas1p and Shm2p occurs at the promoter of two genes in the one-carbon metabolism regulon and that the binding of Shm2p requires Bas1p. Using a yeast-two hybrid system, I have systematically truncated Bas1p from the C-terminal end to find a region responsible for the interaction with Shm2p. My data suggest that Shm2p is directly bound to Bas1p at the promoters of glycine regulated genes where it regulates the transcriptional activity of Bas1p in response to changes in glycine levels.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24588
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Molecular Genetics - Master theses

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