test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24589

Title: Misfolding of Particular PrP and Susceptibility to Prion Infection
Authors: Khan, Muhammad Qasim
Advisor: Chakrabartty, Avijit
Department: Biochemistry
Keywords: Prion protein
prion disease
prion susceptibility
protein misfolding
circular dichroism
analytical ultracentrifugation
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: Pathogenesis of prion diseases in animals is associated with the misfolding of the cellular prion protein PrPC to the infectious form, PrPSc. We hypothesized that an animal’s susceptibility to prions is correlated with the propensity of an animal’s PrPC to adopt a β-sheet, PrPSc-like, conformation. We have developed a method which uses circular dichroism (CD) to directly calculate the relative population of PrP molecules that adopt a β-sheet conformation or the ‘β-state’, as a function of denaturant concentration and pH. We find that the PrP from animals that are more susceptible to prion diseases, like hamsters and mice, adopt the β-state more readily than the PrP from rabbits. The X-ray crystal structure of rabbit PrP reveals a helix-capping motif that may lower the propensity to form the β-state. PrP in the β-state contains both monomeric and octameric β-structured species, and possesses cytotoxic properties.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24589
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Biochemistry - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Khan_Muhammad_Q_20106_MSc_thesis.pdf2.21 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft