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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24594

Title: Perturbation Evoked Balance Control Reactions in Individuals with Stroke
Authors: Lakhani, Bimal
Advisor: McIlroy, William E.
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: Balance
Stroke
Posture
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: Individuals with stroke suffer from impaired balance that increases their risk of falling. Controlling reactive balance is essential to maintaining stability. The objective of the first study was to identify the role of pre-perturbation stance asymmetry on limb preference for reactive stepping in healthy young adults. This study demonstrated that steps taken with a pre-loaded limb are short, directed laterally and have a rapid swing time. The objective of the second study was to investigate the challenges of reactive stepping among individuals with stroke. This study demonstrated that participants primarily execute reactive stepping with their non-paretic limb, although those steps are highlighted by delays in timing and increased incidence of multiple stepping compared to healthy controls, even though all participants had very good clinical balance scores. Outcomes from this thesis present the need for improved clinical assessment of reactive balance control to help reduce the incidence of falling following stroke.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24594
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science - Master theses

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