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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24613

Title: Predicting Vulnerability of Fishes
Authors: O'Malley, Stacey Lee
Advisor: Gross, Mart
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Keywords: conservation
fishes
Canada
vulnerability
assessment
body size
resilience
trophic level
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: Conservation biology would benefit from methods that identify species at risk in a proactive manner, rather than through post-hoc conservation assessments. This study examines the utility of four potential indices for predicting vulnerability in fishes: total body length; trophic level; intrinsic vulnerability score; and, resilience. Statistical analysis was done to determine if correlations existed between any of these four indices and known levels of risk in marine and freshwater Canadian fishes. Results show the success of two of these indices to predict risk: fished species over 78.33 centimeters total length, or with intrinsic vulnerability scores over 57.41 are more highly vulnerable to becoming at risk. Over 20% of Canadian fished species of unknown conservation status are therefore currently vulnerable, and possibly at risk of extinction. This study shows vulnerability indices allow a rapid prioritization of fishes at risk of extinction, and can thus help achieve proactive conservation even in the absence of population decline data.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24613
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology - Master theses

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