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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24621

Title: Recombinant HBsAg Vaccine in Persons with HIV: Is Seroconversion Sufficient for Long-term Protection?
Authors: Powis, Jeff
Advisor: Walmsley, Sharon
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: HIV
Hepatitis B Virus
Vaccination
Immunity
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: The recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine inadequately protects those living with HIV from Hepatitis B virus infection. This study utilized saved serum samples from a retrospective cohort of persons with HIV and documented vaccine-induced HBsAb seroconversion to determine factors associated with persistence of protective levels of HBsAb (≥10mIU/ml). HBsAb levels fell below 10mIU/ml in 27% of the cohort after a median follow-up of 43 months. HIV viral load suppression (<50copies/ml) at the time of vaccination was the major factor associated with persistence of protective levels of HBsAb (OR 3.83, p <0.01). Among individuals who lost protective levels of HBsAb, booster doses of vaccine re-instated the development of protective levels of HBsAb. Delaying or repeating HBV vaccination until after suppression of HIV viral load is achieved should be considered HBV antibody levels should be followed over time and boosters given with loss of protective levels of HBsAb.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24621
Appears in Collections:Master
The Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation - Master theses

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