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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24624

Title: The Role and Regulation of Factor Inhibiting HIF (FIH) in Normal and Pathological Human Placentae
Authors: Racano, Antonella
Advisor: Caniggia, Isabella
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Placenta
Preeclampsia
Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)
Factor Inhibiting HIF (FIH)
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2010
Abstract: Factor inhibiting HIF (FIH) negatively regulates hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity, selectively controlling certain HIF-1 target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prolyl hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3), but not others. PHD3 and VEGF are important for placental development and function and are overexpressed in preeclampsia (PE). The purpose of this study was to examine FIH in both normal and pathological human placentae. I hypothesized that FIH regulates VEGF and PHD3 in the placenta and that this rheostat is altered in PE. Results show that FIH suppresses PHD3 and VEGF in JEG-3 cells; this effect was abrogated by FIH gene silencing. Moreover, my data indicate that seven in absentia homologue-1 (Siah-1) targets FIH for degradation in the placenta; this degradation is enhanced in PE and likely contributes to aberrant VEGF and PHD3 expression. Overall, my data suggest an important role for FIH in the pathogenesis of PE.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24624
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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