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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24628

Title: Dietary Patterns and Incident Type 2 Diabetes mellitus in an Aboriginal Canadian Population
Authors: Reeds, Jacqueline K.
Advisor: Hanley, Anthony James Gordon
Department: Nutritional Sciences
Keywords: Type 2 Diabetes
Aboriginal Canadian
Dietary Patterns
Factor Analysis
Reduced Rank Regression
Issue Date: 28-Jul-2010
Abstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a growing concern worldwide, particularly among Aboriginal Canadians. Diet has been associated with diabetes risk, and dietary pattern analysis (DPA) provides a method in which whole dietary patterns may be explored in relation to disease. Factor analysis (FA) and reduced rank regression (RRR) of data from the Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project identified patterns associated with incident T2DM at follow-up. A RRR-derived pattern characterized by tea, hot cereal, and peas, and low intake of high-sugar foods and beef was positively associated with diabetes; however, the relationship was attenuated with adjustment for age and other covariates. A FA-derived pattern characterized by processed foods was positively associated with incident T2DM in a multivariate model (OR=1.38; CIs: 1.02, 1.86 per unit), suggesting intake of processed foods may predict T2DM risk.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24628
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Nutritional Sciences - Master theses

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