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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25397

Title: Predictors of Partial Nephrectomy Utilization and Inequities of Care in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma in Canada
Authors: Abouassaly, Robert
Advisor: Alibhai, Shabbir Muhammad Husayn
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: Kidney Cancer
Nephrectomy
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2010
Abstract: Compared to radical nephrectomy (RN), partial nephrectomy (PN) leads to improved renal function preservation. However, PN may be infrequently utilized, particularly in patients susceptible to chronic kidney disease. We conducted a population-based, retrospective, observational study using the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. All patients treated for a renal mass with either RN or PN from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 2008 were included in the analysis. Using descriptive statistics and multivariable regression modelling, we demonstrated low uptake of PN (17.5% overall); year, age, geographic region, Charlson score, hospital volume, and physician volume were independently associated with PN use, whereas DM, HTN and income quintile were not. In this contemporary analysis PN continues to be underutilized, and the rate of PN in DM, HTN and the elderly was less than expected given their known relationship to chronic renal failure.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25397
Appears in Collections:Master
The Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation - Master theses

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