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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25402

Title: Early Developmental Alterations in GABAergic Protein Expression in Fragile X Knockout Mice
Authors: Adusei, Daniel C.
Advisor: Hampson, David R.
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Keywords: Fragile X syndrome
Fmr1 knockout mice
GABAergic system
GABA(A) receptor
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2010
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GABAergic proteins in Fmr1 knockout mice during brain maturation and to assess behavioural changes potentially linked to perturbations in the GABAergic system. Quantitative western blotting of the forebrain revealed that compared to wild-type mice, the GABAA receptor α1, β2, and δ subunits, and the GABA catabolic enzymes GABA transaminase and SSADH were down-regulated during postnatal development, while GAD65 was up-regulated in the adult knockout mouse forebrain. In tests of locomotor activity, the suppressive effect on motor activity of the GABAA β2/3 subunit-selective drug loreclezole was impaired in the mutant mice. In addition, sleep time induced by the GABAA β2/3-selective anaesthetic drug etomidate was decreased in the knockout mice. Our results indicate that disruptions in the GABAergic system in the developing brain may result in behavioural consequences in adults with fragile X syndrome.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25402
Appears in Collections:Master
Leslie L. Dan Faculty of Pharmacy - Master theses

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