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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25408

Title: Pressure Dependence and Volumetric Properties of Short DNA Hairpins
Authors: Amiri, Amir Reza
Advisor: Macgregor, Robert B.
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Keywords: DNA hairpins
Transition Volume
Short
cruciform
antisense
pressure
hydrostatic
phase diagram
temperature
volume
enthalpy
salt
sodium
hydration
water
loop
stem
hydrophobic
stability
high pressure
melting temperature
ion release
G-quadruplexes
telomeric sequence
G-quartets
DNA tetraplexes
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2010
Abstract: Previous studies of short DNA hairpins have revealed that loop and stem sequences can significantly affect the thermodynamic stability of short DNA hairpins. Nevertheless, there has not been sufficient investigation into the pressure-temperature stability of DNA hairpins, and the current thermodynamic knowledge of DNA hairpins’ stability is limited to the temperature domain. In this work, we report the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the helix-coil transition temperature (TM) for eleven short DNA hairpins at different salt concentrations by performing UV-monitored melting. The studied hairpins form by intramolecular folding of 16-base self-complementary DNA oligo¬deoxy¬ribonucleotides. Model dependent (van’t Hoff) transition parameters such as ΔHvH and transition volume (ΔV) were estimated from analysis of optical melting transitions. Experiments revealed the ΔV for denaturation of these molecules range from -2.35 to +6.74 cm3mol-1. The difference in the volume change for this transition is related to differences in the hydration of these molecules.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25408
Appears in Collections:Master
Leslie L. Dan Faculty of Pharmacy - Master theses

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