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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25438

Title: The Role of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (Ddr1) on Macrophages in Adhesion and Cytokine Production
Authors: Britto, Karen Elma
Advisor: Bendeck, Michelle
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: DDR1
Macrophage
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2010
Abstract: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the cardiovascular system. Discoidin domain receptor 1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds collagens. Previous work in our lab has shown that deleting DDR1 in a mouse model results in attenuation of atherosclerosis, with fewer macrophages in the plaque. The aim of this study was to determine what changes in macrophage behaviour due to the lack of DDR1 was attenuating plaque development. In order to carry out experiments, primary mouse peritoneal macrophages were used. DDR1-deficient macrophages adhered significantly less to type IV collagen and fibronectin compared to DDR1-expressing cells. In addition, when plated on type IV collagen and fibronectin, DDR1-deficient macrophages produced decreased levels of MCP-1 protein, a cytokine known to be important in plaque development, particularly in leukocyte recruitment to plaque. These results suggest that DDR1 is an important mediator in macrophage adhesion to matrix and macrophage cytokine production
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25438
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology - Master theses

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