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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25448

Title: Beyond Special and Differential Treatment: Regional Integration as a Means to Growth in East Asia
Authors: Chan, Su Jin
Advisor: Trebilcock, Michael
Department: Law
Keywords: International trade
special differential treatment
Asia
regional trade agreement
rules of origin
dispute settlement
East Asia
regional integration
regionalism
multilateralism
ASEAN
FTAAP
EARTA
developing countries
institutions
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2010
Abstract: Special and differential treatment (SDT) provisions in GATT were created to assist developing countries achieve economic progress while assimilating into the multilateral trading system. Despite these intentions, global trade imbalances still persist. Within this context, I focus on the region of East Asia which has experienced astounding growth in just several decades, propelling it far beyond other developing country regions. Although international trade continues to be the crucial factor driving growth in the region, reliance on SDT has in certain circumstances hindered development. As such, East Asia should seek alternatives to SDT. In that vein, I argue that sustainable growth and trade liberalization can be achieved by enhancing integration through a regional trade agreement. I further discuss various proposals for an East Asian trade agreement such as ASEAN+3, FTAAP, and EARTA. Finally, I highlight the importance of governance and identify several institutions essential for a successful regional arrangement.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25448
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Law - Master theses

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