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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25457

Title: Climate Change and Human Rights: A Case Study of the Canadian Inuit and Global Warming in the Canadian Arctic
Authors: Clarke, Meghan
Advisor: Jutta, Brunnee
Department: Law
Keywords: Human rights
Climate change
Issue Date: 17-Dec-2010
Abstract: Climate change debates have typically centred around the environmental and economic effects of rising greenhouse gas emissions. The focus, however, has recently begun to shift towards acknowledging the human impacts of global climate change, especially in vulnerable regions and communities. This thesis considers whether human rights law can compensate for the inability of traditional, state-centred, environmental law and international law to address the human impacts of climate change. By using the situation of the Canadian Inuit as a case study, this thesis focuses on 'greening' existing human rights to address the environmental damage in the Canadian Arctic as a result of climate change. This study concludes that, although international human rights regimes provide potential forums for groups such as the Canadian Inuit, substantive environmental human rights are necessary in international law in order to best address the complex intersection of environmental degradation, such as climate change, and human rights.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25457
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Law - Master theses

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