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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25465

Title: Biomimetic Design Applied to the Redesign of a PEM Fuel Cell Flow Field
Authors: Currie, Jessica Marie
Advisor: Wallace, James S.
Shu, Lily H.
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: PEM
fuel cell
flow field
biomimetic
design
Issue Date: 17-Dec-2010
Abstract: In this thesis biomimetic design is applied to the redesign of a PEM fuel cell flow field. A number of designs inspired by biological phenomena were developed to address the problem of attaining a uniform current density distribution across a PEM fuel cell. These designs are evaluated using a numerical model. One design, inspired by Murray’s law of branching in plants and animals, is further evaluated using and a physical model and comparing it to a commercial triple serpentine flow field. Improvements in pressure drop were seen for the Murray’s law inspired flow field, however, it was found to be prone to flooding. If this flow field design were to be applied to high temperature membrane materials, materials that can operate above 100 °C where water is always in the vapor state, the mass transfer and reduced pressure drop advantages of the Murray flow field could be fully achieved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25465
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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