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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25500

Title: ON THE PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF SYPHILIS IN THE BRITISH ARMY; AND ITS PREVENTION.
Authors: Dartnell, George Russell
Keywords: British Army
Montreal garrison
Public examination
Public health
syphilis
Issue Date: 28-Apr-1860
Publisher: BMJ
Citation: Dartnell GR. ON THE PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF SYPHILIS IN THE BRITISH ARMY; AND ITS PREVENTION. BMJ 1860; 1: 317-9
Description: (Extract)The citizens of the southern States of the Union are frequent visitors to Canada in the hot season of the year. They resort, generally, in considerable numbers to the large garrison towns, and take great delight in witnessing the parades and exercises of the British troops, and listening to the military bands. Along the front of the principal barrack at Montreal there ran, at the period to which I allude, a long wooden balcony, at one end of which was the room in which the bend of one of the infantry regiments practised at a certain hour every day, and this was, of course, a point of unusual attraction to the American visitors. One day, while the health-inspection was going on, a large party of ladies and gentlemen entered the barrack square, and passed on, unnoticed, towards the music-room, to take up their customary position in front of the open window. It so happened, unfortunately, at the very moment they presented themselves at the window, that the medical officer entered the room by a side door; as he did so, the men (all stripped to their shirts, and drawn up in line to face the window) were called to "attention " by the sergeant-maor; uLp went the shirt tails, by a simultaneous movement, like the curtain of a theatre, and away rushed the ladies and their gentlemen friends from the barrack square, shocked and indignant, as may readily be supposed. I only mention this incident to show what an untoward result, once at least, followed this mode of procedure; and what an offensive, indecent, and humiliating a duty the military medical officer is called on to performperform it, indeed, how he may.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25500
Appears in Collections:historyofsurgery.ca

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