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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25503

Title: Novel Properties of SP cells in STS, and How They May Be Targeted to Develop Potential Therapies
Authors: Wang, Chang Ye Yale
Advisor: Alman, Benjamin
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: Cancer
Stem Cell
Soft-tissue sarcoma
sarcoma
Notch
Hedgehog
Therapy
Issue Date: 30-Dec-2010
Abstract: Tumours contain heterogeneous cell populations. A population enriched in tumour-initiating potential has been identified in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) by the isolation of "side population" (SP) cells. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of SP and non-SP cells in STS and identified Hedgehog (Hh) and Notch pathways as potential candidates for the targeting of SP cells. Upon verification of the activation of these pathways in SP cells, using primary tumor xenografts in NOD-SCID mice as our experimental model, we used the Hh blocker Triparanol and the Notch blocker DAPT to demonstrate that the suppression of these pathways effectively depleted the abundance of SP cells, reduced tumour growth, and inhibited the tumour-initiating potential of the treated sarcoma cells upon secondary transplantation. The data provide additional evidence that SP cells act as tumour initiating cells and points to Hh and Notch pathways as enticing targets for developing potential cancer therapies.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25503
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology - Master theses

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