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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25506

Title: Contextual Processing of Objects: Using Virtual Reality to Improve Abstraction and Cognitive Flexibility in Children with Autism
Authors: Wang, Michelle Jai-Chin
Advisor: Reid, Denise
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: autism
virtual reality
cognitive rehabilitation
single-subject design
executive function
cognitive flexibility
Issue Date: 30-Dec-2010
Abstract: Background: The current study investigated the efficacy of a novel virtual reality-cognitive rehabilitation (VR-CR) intervention to improve contextual processing of objects in children with autism. Contextual processing is a cognitive ability thought to underlie the social and communication deficits of autism. Previous research supports that children with autism show deficits in contextual processing, as well as deficits in its basic component abilities: abstraction and cognitive flexibility. Methods: Four children with autism participated in a multiple baseline single-subject study. The children were taught how to see objects in context by reinforcing attention to pivotal contextual information. One-on-one teaching sessions occurred three times per week for approximately two weeks. Results: All children demonstrated significant improvements in contextual processing and cognitive flexibility. Mixed results were found on the control test. Changes in context-related behaviours were reported. Conclusions: Further studies using virtual reality to target specific cognitive impairments in children with autism are warranted.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25506
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science - Master theses

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