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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25512

Title: Coordinated Land Use and Transportation Planning – A Sketch Modelling Approach
Authors: Williams, Marcus
Advisor: Miller, Eric
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: land use
transportation
planning
model
scenario planning
winnipeg
sketch
Issue Date: 30-Dec-2010
Abstract: A regional planning model is designed to facilitate coordinated land use and transportation planning, yet have a sufficiently simple structure to enable quick scenario turnaround. The model, TransPLUM, is built on two existing commercial software products: the Population and Land Use Model (PLUM); and a four-stage travel model implemented in a standard software package. Upon creating scenarios users are able to examine a host of results (zonal densities, origin-destination trip flows and travel times by mode, network link flows, etc) which may prompt modification of a reference land use plan and/or network plan. A zonal density-accessibility ratio is described: an index which identifies the relative utilization of a zone and which could serve as a coordinating feedback mechanism. The model was implemented for a pilot study area – the Winnipeg Capital Region. Development of a baseline scenario is discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25512
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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