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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25516

Title: The China Syndrome: Challenges for Addressing Climate Change in the 21st Century
Authors: Wilson, Arthur Dillon
Advisor: Brunnee, Jutta
Department: Law
Keywords: Climate Change
Common but Differentiated Responsibility
China
Fairness
International Environmental Law
Issue Date: 30-Dec-2010
Abstract: Climate change is the greatest environmental international problem facing the world today. This paper begins with a review of the climate change regime to date showing the mistakes that were made leading to failure in Copenhagen. It looks at China’s unique position in the international community and concludes that a meaningful climate change solution is not possible without China’s participation. It examines the concepts of CBDR and fairness to determine whether it is fair for the world to demand China’s participation. It looks at characteristics which should be present in a fair climate change solution, and concludes with a brief look at international trade law to determine what alternatives would be available to a coalition of willing states to encourage China’s participation in a global solution or, in a worst case scenario, to form an effective solution without China’s willing participation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25516
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Law - Master theses

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