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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25542

Title: Effect of Stress on Nicotine Self-administration on Adolescent and Adult Rats
Authors: Zou, Sheng
Advisor: Le, Anh Dzung
Department: Pharmacology
Keywords: nicotine
self-administration
stress
adolescent
yohimbine
footshock
social defeat
rats
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: Initiation of smoking mainly occurs during adolescence. Adolescents experience more stressful life events; therefore, stress may be a factor that contributes to this high risk of smoking initiation. The current study examines the effects of three different stressors (yohimbine, intermittent footshock and social defeat) on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in adolescent and adult rats. The effects of yohimbine and footshock were examined after the establishment of NSA behavior, while the effect of social defeat was tested on the initiation of NSA behavior. Yohimbine increased NSA, but the other two stressors did not. The increase in NSA induced by yohimbine tended to be higher in adults than in adolescents. No marked age differences in response to the other two stressors were observed. These results suggest that stress increases NSA in a stressor-specific manner, and that adolescents do not show enhanced vulnerability to the effect of stress on NSA.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25542
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology - Master theses

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