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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25558

Title: Towards an Understanding of Zebrafish Epiboly: The Characterization of the Epiboly Initiation Mutant Eomesodermin A
Authors: Du, Susan
Advisor: Bruce, Ashley
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: Zebrafish
Epiboly
Morphogenesis
Gastrulation
Eomesodermin A
T-box transcription factor
Endoderm
Microtubules
yolk cell
doming
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: How cell movements are coordinated during morphogenesis is not well understood. We focus on epiboly, which describes the thinning and spreading of a multilayered cell sheet. The first phase of epiboly involves the doming of the yolk cell up into the overlying blastoderm. We previously showed that over-expression of a dominant– negative eomesodermin a construct inhibits doming. Here I report my analysis of embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic Eomesodermin A (MZeomesa). eomesafh105 mutant embryos (1) exhibit a doming delay, (2) have defective yolk cell microtubules, (3) have tightly packed deep cells with more bleb – like protrusions and (4) express early endoderm markers abnormally. Despite these phenotypes, the majority of MZeomesa embryos are able to complete epiboly and form endodermal derivatives. In both Xenopus and mice, Eomesodermin has also been implicated in the regulation of gastrulation movements and cell fate specification, suggesting a conserved role for Eomesodermin throughout vertebrate development.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25558
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

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