test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25560

Title: Planar Photonic Crystals for Biosensing
Authors: El Beheiry, Mohamed
Advisor: Levi, Ofer
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: photonic crystals
biosensing
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: In this thesis, planar photonic crystals for optofluidic biosensing applications are analyzed. Planar photonic crystals are optically resonant structures which possess modal characteristics which can be exploited for biosensing applications. Sensing is achieved by detecting changes in refractive index due to analyte interactions in a sampled fluid. This work describes a broad study of photonic crystal slab sensors, with special consideration to biosensing. Outlined are considerations pertaining to sensing figures of merit, device fabrication, and performance. Results of simulations and device characterization indicate that planar photonic crystals possess sensing attributes similar or better than existing optically resonant refractive index sensors, such as surface plasmon resonance, grating, and interferometric waveguide sensors. Additionally, these photonic crystals can be patterned in large-areas which enable a simple light coupling scheme. All considered, their appeal as a biosensing solution is justified in the area of in vitro diagnostics.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25560
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
ElBeheiry_Mohamed_201011_MASc_thesis.pdf12.11 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft