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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25572

Title: The Fates of Vanadium and Sulfur Introduced with Petcoke to Lime Kilns
Authors: Fan, Xiaofei
Advisor: Tran, Honghi
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: pulp and paper
petroleum coke
vanadium
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: Petroleum coke (petcoke) has been burned at kraft pulp mills to partially substitute for natural gas and fuel oil used in lime kilns. Due to the high vanadium and sulfur contents in petcoke, there had been concerns over the impact of burning petcoke on kiln and chemical recovery operations. Laboratory studies were performed to examine the fate of vanadium and sulfur in lime kilns and chemical recovery cycle. The results suggest that most of the vanadium in petcoke quickly forms calcium vanadates with lime in the kiln, mostly 3CaO•V2O5. In the causticizers, calcium vanadates react with Na2CO3 in green liquor to form sodium vanadate (NaVO3). Due to its high solubility, NaVO3 dissolves in the liquor circulating around the chemical recovery system. V becomes enriched in the liquor, leading to vanadium build-up in the system. The S in petcoke would stay in the reburned lime, lower the lime availability, increase SO2 emissions from the kiln stack, alter the S balance, increase the liquor sulphidity, and potentially contribute to ring formation in the kiln.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25572
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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