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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25577

Title: Myocyte Androgen Receptor Modulates Body Composition and Metabolic Parameters
Authors: Fernando, Shannon M.
Advisor: Monks, D. Ashley
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: endocrinology
metabolism
androgens
skeletal muscle
adipose tissue
transgenic
androgen receptor
testosterone
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: Androgens (such as testosterone) have been shown to increase lean body mass and reduce fat body mass in men through activation of androgen receptors (AR). While this suggests a potential clinical use for androgens, attempts at utilization of this class of hormones as a therapeutic are limited by side effects due to indiscriminate AR activation in various tissues. Thus, a greater understanding of the tissues and cells involved in promoting these changes would be beneficial. Here we show that selective overexpression of AR in muscle cells of transgenic (HSA-AR) rodents both increases lean muscle mass and significantly reduces fat mass in males. Similar effects can be induced in HSA-AR females treated with testosterone. Metabolic analyses of HSA-AR males show that these animals demonstrate increased O2 consumption and hypermetabolism. Thus, targeted activation of AR in muscle regulates body composition and metabolism, suggesting a novel target for drug development.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25577
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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