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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25579

Title: Response Shift Following Surgery of the Lumbar Spine
Authors: Finkelstein, Joel
Advisor: Davis, Aileen M.
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Response shift, lumbar spine surgery, functional outcomes
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: This study is a prospective longitudinal outcome study investigating the presence of response shift in disease and generic functional outcome measures in 105 patients undergoing spinal surgery. The then-test method which compares pre-test scores to retrospective pre-test scores was used to quantitate response shift. There was a statistically significant response shift for the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (p=0.001) and the Short Form-36-PCS (p=0.078). At three months, seventy-two percent of patients exhibited a response shift with the ODI. Fifty-six and 21 percent of patients exhibited a response shift with the SF-36 physical and mental component scores respectively. When accounting for response shift and using the minimal clinically important difference, the success rate of the surgery at 3 months increased by 20 percent. The presence of response shift has implications for the measurement properties of standard spinal surgery outcome measures including the effect size of treatment and the number of responders to treatment.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25579
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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