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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25586

Title: PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies
Authors: Fung, Keith Kin Kei
Advisor: Wallace, James S.
Shu, Lily H.
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell
Biomimitic Design
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25586
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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