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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25597

Title: A Visual Theory of Natsume Sōseki: the Emperor and the Modern Meiji Man
Authors: Go, Nicole Belinda
Advisor: Sakaki, Atsuko
Department: East Asian Studies
Keywords: Natsume Sōseki
Meiji
emperor
Japan
Sanshirō
London
Manchuria
colonialism
Michel Foucault
Frantz Fanon
visuality
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: This thesis explores the affect of the emperor-centred visual culture on Sōseki’s use of visual methodologies in his travel writing in London and Manchuria, as well as his novel Sanshirō. In Part I of this thesis, I argue that Sōseki’s anxiety and ambivalence was in part due to the visual culture created around an imperial image infused with symbolic power. Part II of this thesis is almost a reversal of the first, as it discusses Sōseki’s use of deliberately visual methodologies to express his anxiety and ambivalence towards modernity. In light of my discussion of these complex visual techniques, I conclude by briefly addressing the allegations of Sōseki’s complicity in Japanese imperialism and the (non-)politicization of his work. While Sōseki’s anxiety and ambivalence may have been caused by the extremely visual culture centred on the emperor, it also provided him with a means and methodology for expressing his pessimism.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25597
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of East Asian Studies - Master theses

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