test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25599

Title: Assessment of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire for use in Patients following Neck Dissection for Head and Neck Cancer
Authors: Goldstein, David
Advisor: Davis, Aileen M.
Irish, Jonathan
Ringash, G. Jolie
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: neck dissection
shoulder disability
Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2010
Abstract: In this cross-sectional study, the sensibility, reliability, and validity of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire were assessed in patients who underwent neck dissection for head and neck cancer. A sensibility questionnaire was used to assess face and content validity. Test-retest reliability was tested by re-mailing the questionnaire; validity, by evaluating differences in scores between patients undergoing different types of neck dissections and by correlating DASH scores with Neck Dissection Impairment Index (NDII) scores. The DASH was considered sensible by both patients and surgeons. The DASH was reliable with an intraclass coefficient of 0.91. The DASH showed differences between patients who underwent accessory nerve-sacrifice and nerve-sparing neck dissection. DASH scores strongly correlated with NDII scores. Thus, the DASH is a sensible, reliable, and valid instrument for assessing shoulder impairments and activity limitations following neck dissection.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25599
Appears in Collections:Master
The Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Goldstein_David_P_201011_MSc_thesis.pdf1.42 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft