test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25612

Title: Partial Zero-forcing Precoding for Interference Channels with Limited Transmitter Cooperation
Authors: Hari, Siddarth
Advisor: Yu, Wei
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Interference Channels
Transmitter Cooperation
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: This thesis looks at the problem of designing a coding strategy for interference channels with rate-limited transmitter cooperation. We first consider a simple communication model in which the classic two-user Gaussian interference channel is augmented by rate-limited conferencing links between the transmitters. The main contribution is a partial zero-forcing precoding strategy based on a shared-private rate splitting scheme at the transmitter, in which each transmitter communicates part of its message to the other transmitter, and subsequently partially pre-subtracts the interfering signal using a zero-forcing precoder. We extend the proposed strategy to a class of multiuser interference channels, and outline a distributed algorithm to compute the precoder coefficients. The partial zero-forcing precoding strategy is shown to be particularly effective in certain high SNR/INR regimes, and simulation results for a multicell system highlight the cooperation gain due to the proposed strategy.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25612
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Hari_Siddarth_201011_MASc_thesis.pdf432.22 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft