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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25626

Title: Evaluation of an In situ formed Bioabsorbable Membrane and Hyperbaric Oxygen on Bone Regeneration using Alloplastic Bone Substitutes in Critical Sized Rabbit Calvarial Defects
Authors: Humber, Craig
Advisor: Sandor, George K. B.
Department: Dentistry
Keywords: Membrane
Bone graft
Hyperbaric Oxygen
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: The aim of this study was to test the application of an in situ–formed synthetic polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a biodegradable membrane with a variety of graft materials and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) for enhanced bone regeneration. Critical-sized rabbit calvarial defects were created in bilateral parietal bones. Group 1 served as a control with unfilled defects, Group 2 had defects filled with morcelized autogenous bone, and Group 3 had defects filled with biphasic calcium phosphate. One defect was protected PEG membrane and half the animals were subjected to HBOT treatment. The unsupported membrane didn’t produce the desired bone regeneration in the unfilled and bone grafted groups. HBO didn't ameliorate the bone grafted or ceramic filled defects over the 6-week time period. Caution is recommended with the membrane over unsupported defects. Future assessments with HBO should be completed at the 12-week time point.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25626
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Dentistry - Master theses

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