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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25631

Title: Factors Influencing the Formation and Development of Microalgal Biofilms
Authors: Irving, Tyler E.
Advisor: Allen, D. Grant
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: Microalgae
Biofilm
Photobioreactor
adhesion
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: Differences in biofilm formation between Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris were examined, as well as the effects of substrate properties. Species selection and species control had significant effects. In non-sterile conditions, C. vulgaris shifted from planktonic (23.7% attachment) to sessile (79.8% attachment) growth, and formed films of higher average thickness (52 ± 19 µm) than in sterile conditions (7 ± 6 µm). By contrast, S. obliquus attained similar thicknesses (54 ± 31 µm and 53 ± 38 µm) in both sterile and non-sterile conditions. The effect of substrate properties was minimal. Both species grew films of similar thickness (~ 30 µm for S. obliquus, <10 µm for C. vulgaris) on materials ranging from hydrophilic (glass) to hydrophobic (polytetrafluoroethylene). Micropatterning the surface also had little effect on film formation. The results indicate that species selection and species control are more important that substrate properties in the development of microalgal biofilms.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25631
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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