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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25635

Title: Cognitive Variability in High-functioning Individuals & its Implications for the Practice of Clinical Neuropsychology
Authors: Jeffay, Eliyas
Advisor: Zakzanis, Konstantine
Department: Psychology
Keywords: cognitive variability
high-functioning
intraindividual variability
clinical neuropsychology
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: Knowledge of the literature pertaining to patterns of performance in normal individuals is essential if we are to understand intraindividual variability in neurocognitive test performance in neuropsychiatric disorders. Twenty-five healthy individuals with a high-level of education were evaluated on a short neuropsychological battery which spanned several cognitive domains. ---Results indicated that cognitive abilities are not equally distributed within a sample of healthy, high-level functioning individuals. This may be of interest to neuropsychologists who might base clinical inference about the presence of cerebral dysfunction, at least in part, on marked variation in a patient’s level of cognitive test performance. The practice of deductive reasoning in clinical neuropsychology may be prone to false-positive conclusions about cognitive functioning in neuropsychiatric disorders where base-rates of cognitive impairments are low and pre-existing educational achievements are high.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25635
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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