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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25639

Title: The BMPRII Tail Domain Modulates the Magnitude of BMP7 Signalling
Authors: Jian, Yongqiang
Advisor: Attisano, Liliana
Department: Biochemistry
Keywords: BMPRII
Bone morphogenetic protein
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: BMPRII, a BMP type II receptor, plays an important role in regulating diverse biological events. BMPRII contains a long carboxyl tail domain, which is highly conserved among vertebrate species. The tail domain has been shown to regulate cytoskeleton remodeling, whereas the function in regulating canonical BMP signalling is not well studied. Here, I show that the BMPRII tail domain reduces the magnitude of BMP7-induced pSmad1 activation in the early stage, which also changes the magnitude of BMP target gene expression. Furthermore, my data also suggest that the BMPRII tail not only modulates BMP7-induced Smad1 carboxyl terminal phosphorylation, but also inhibits endogenous BMP signalling under overexpression conditions. Finally, BMP7 promotes Neuro2a neurite extension and I demonstrate that knockdown of BMPRII affects BMP7 induced neurite outgrowth. Altogether, these studies demonstrate that the BMPRII tail may play a role in regulating responsiveness to BMP7, and thereby modulates BMP7 dependent neurite extension in neuronal cells.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25639
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Biochemistry - Master theses

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