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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25643

Title: The Myth of Olympic Unity: The Dilemma of Diversity, Olympic Oppression, and the Politics of Difference
Authors: Devitt, Mark
Advisor: Boler, Megan
Norris, Trevor
Department: Theory and Policy Studies in Education
Keywords: Dilemma of Diversity
Politics of Difference
Olympics
Oppression
Aboriginal Appropriation
Sportive Nationalism
Educational Materials
Dwight Boyd
Iris Marion Young
Branding
Multiculturalism
Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: The dilemma of diversity is the tension that exists when prescriptive claims are required across reasonable pluralism. Scholar and philosopher Dwight Boyd believes that the dilemma of diversity must be addressed for the continued health of multicultural societies, and suggests that the solution can be found through democratic reciprocity. Though the International Olympic Committee (IOC) markets unity and peace through its Olympic Games, does the Olympics relieve the dilemma of diversity? By critically examining the IOC’s historic and recent treatment of Aboriginals, its encouragement of divisive nationalism, and its educational programs, it is clear that the IOC does not embrace reasonable pluralism. The IOC’s public pedagogy is one that conceals its dominance through diversity. In exposing this dominance, I will argue that the IOC must embrace democratic reciprocity that allows for conversation across difference. Adopting an authentic acceptance of difference will alleviate the IOC’s propagation of Western ideology through neo-imperialism.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25643
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Theory and Policy Studies in Education - Master theses

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