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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25670

Title: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Tier 2 Vocabulary Intervention on the Writing and Spelling of Elementary Students with Dyslexia: A Formative Case Study
Authors: Reiss, Evelyn
Advisor: Stagg Peterson, Shelley
Department: Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
Keywords: spelling
dyslexia
writing
formative case study
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2011
Abstract: This formative case study sought to explore the effectiveness of a remedial intervention based on Tier 2 word meanings for students whose primary deficit is phonological. Within the framework of a formative design research study, collaboration between a special education teacher and the researcher allowed for adaption and delivery of content while providing an opportunity to develop teacher capacity as well as student ability. The study found that focusing on the teaching of word meaning enhanced the remedial program due to the inclusion of a greater range of teaching strategies. Too few words were taught in order to bring about a significant improvement in vocabulary knowledge or spelling skill; however, most of the students believed they had improved in spelling and their attitude to writing was more positive at the end of the study. Several students showed improvement in written expression.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25670
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning - Master theses

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