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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25703

Title: Hydrogel/Electrospun Fiber Composites Influence Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Fate
Authors: Hsieh, Ming-Yi
Advisor: Shoichet, Molly
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Issue Date: 3-Jan-2011
Abstract: Cell replacement therapy with multi-potent neural/stem progenitor cell into the injured spinal cord is limited by poor survival and host tissue integration. An injectable and biocompatible polymeric cell delivery system serves as a promising strategy to facilitate cell delivery, promote cell survival and direct cell behaviour. We developed and characterized the use of a physical hydrogel blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose for NSPC delivery, and incorporated electrospun fibers of collagen or P(CL:DLLA) to promote cell-matrix interactions and influence cell behaviour. HAMC was shown to be both cytocompatible and allow NSPC differentiation in vitro. Inclusion of electrospun fibers in the HAMC hydrogel further influenced cell behaviour. Composite systems of P(CL:DLLA) fibers in HAMC maintained cell survival/proliferation and enhanced neuronal and oligodendrocytic differentiation similar to HAMC. The importance of the cell delivery vehicle to NSPC survival and cell fate was demonstrated in vitro and will be tested in on-going studies in vivo.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25703
Appears in Collections:Master

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