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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25731

Title: Interaction Between the Effects of Preparation Method and Variety on the Glycemic Index of Novel Potato Varieties
Authors: Kinnear, Tara
Advisor: Wolever, Thomas M. S.
Department: Nutritional Sciences
Keywords: Glycemic Index
Potatoes
In-vivo Digestability
Starch
Issue Date: 6-Jan-2011
Abstract: As part of a project to see whether potatoes with a low glycemic-index (GI) could be developed through plant breeding, the GI values of 4 new potato varieties differing in starch structure was determined in 3 studies over 2 years in human subjects. Since cooking and cooling affects starch structure the potatoes were studied both freshly cooked (boiled) and cooled. The first study showed that cooling reduced the GI of two varieties by 40-50% but had no effect in the others (treatment × variety interaction, p=0.024), an effect which was confirmed in study 2. Differences in GI were readily explained by differences in starch structure or in-vitro digestion rate. Carbohydrate malabsorption increased from 3 to 5% upon cooling, not enough to account for the reduced GI. It is concluded that the effect on GI of cooling cooked potatoes varies in different varieties. Further research is needed to understand the mechanism.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25731
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Nutritional Sciences - Master theses

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