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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25732

Title: Syntaxin-3 Regulates Biphasic Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in the Pancreatic Beta Cell
Authors: Koo, Ellen
Advisor: Gaisano, Herbert Young
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Insulin Secretion
Syntaxin
SNAREs
Exocytosis
Issue Date: 7-Jan-2011
Abstract: Our study aims to investigate the role of Syntaxin-3 in glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and how it regulates the recruitment to plasma membrane and/or exocytotic fusion of insulin granules. We examined endogenous Syn-3 function by down-regulating its expression using siRNA/lenti-shRNA, which impaired GSIS. Although Syn-3 depleted cells showed no change in the number and fusion of docked granules, there was a reduction in newcomer granules and their subsequent exocytotic fusion. We then examined the effects of overexpressing Syn-3-WT, which enhanced biphasic GSIS. Since open conformation (OF) Syn-1A was reported to enhance exocytosis by promoting SNARE complex formation, we constructed OF Syn-3. Exogenous OF Syn-3 had no effect on secretion as it is unable to be trafficked to insulin granules. Taken together, we conclude that Syn-3 facilitates mobilization of newcomer insulin granules to the plasma membrane, to contribute to both first and second phase of GSIS in pancreatic beta cells.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25732
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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