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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25766

Title: Effects of Cyclic Hydraulic Pressure on Osteocytes
Authors: Liu, Chao
Advisor: You, Lidan
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: biomechanics
bone
mechanotransduction
osteocyte
Issue Date: 10-Jan-2011
Abstract: Bone changes composition and structure to adapt to its mechanical environment. Osteocytes are putative mechanosensors responsible for orchestrating the bone remodeling process. Recent in vitro studies showed that osteocytes could sense and respond to substrate strain and fluid shear. However the capacity of osteocytes to sense cyclic hydraulic pressure (CHP) associated with physiological mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study, osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells were subjected to CHP of 68 kPa at 0.5 Hz, and the effects of CHP on intracellular calcium concentration, cytoskeleton organization, mRNA expression of genes related to bone remodeling, and osteocyte apoptosis were investigated. The results indicate that osteocytes could sense CHP and respond by increased intracellular calcium concentration, altered microtubule organization, an increase in COX-2 mRNA level and RANKL/OPG mRNA ratio, and decreased apoptosis. Therefore cyclic hydraulic pressure in bone a mechanical stimulus to osteocytes and may play a role in regulating bone remodeling.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25766
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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