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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25790

Title: Music Processing in Deaf Adults with Cochlear Implants
Authors: Saindon, Mathieu R.
Advisor: Trehub, Sandra E.
Schellenberg, E. Glenn
Department: Psychology
Keywords: cochlear implants
music
hearing
pitch
rhythm
timbre
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2011
Abstract: Cochlear implants (CIs) provide coarse representations of pitch, which are adequate for speech but not for music. Despite increasing interest in music processing by CI users, the available information is fragmentary. The present experiment attempted to fill this void by conducting a comprehensive assessment of music processing in adult CI users. CI users (n =6) and normally hearing (NH) controls (n = 12) were tested on several tasks involving melody and rhythm perception, recognition of familiar music, and emotion of recognition in speech and music. CI performance was substantially poorer than NH performance and at chance levels on pitch processing tasks. Performance was highly variable, however, with one individual achieving NH performance levels on some tasks, probably because of low-frequency residual hearing in his unimplanted ear. Future research with a larger sample of CI users can shed light on factors associated with good and poor music processing in this population.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25790
Appears in Collections:Master

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