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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25830

Title: Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Redundant Stent-graft Configurations in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair
Authors: Tse, Leonard
Advisor: Amon, Cristina
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: endovascular
aneurysm
computational fluid dynamics
CFD
EVAR
redundancy
stent-graft
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2011
Abstract: During endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), if the stent-graft device is too long for a given patient the redundant (extra) length adopts a convex configuration in the aneurysm. Based on clinical experience, we hypothesize that redundant stent-graft configurations increase the downward force acting on the device, thereby increasing the risk of device dislodgement and failure. This work numerically studies both steady-state and physiologic pulsatile blood flow in redundant stent-graft configurations. Computational fluid dynamics simulations predicted a peak downward displacement force for the zero-, moderate- and severe-redundancy configurations of 7.36, 7.44 and 7.81 N, respectively for steady-state flow; and 7.35, 7.41 and 7.85 N, respectively for physiologic pulsatile flow. These results suggest that redundant stent-graft configurations in EVAR do increase the downward force acting on the device, but the clinical consequence depends significantly on device-specific resistance to dislodgement.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25830
Appears in Collections:Master

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