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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25847

Title: Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons, Orthodontists, and Laypersons to Altered Facial Balance
Authors: Marcy, Sean
Advisor: Forrest, Christopher
Department: Dentistry
Keywords: Facial Asymmetry
Perception
Issue Date: 12-Jan-2011
Abstract: Objective: To quantify the acceptability of facial asymmetry to plastic surgeons, orthodontists and the lay population. Methods: Facial images were animated with one of six asymmetries: jaw and nasal deviation, interocular distance, ocular height, angulation, and shape. Evaluators were asked to judge the faces based on their visual acceptability. Results: There were no differences between the groups except for in the evaluation of ocular shape. Mandibular deviation of 4mm, and nasal deviation of 3mm was judged as unacceptable. 9% rounder and 18% flatter eyes were considered unacceptable. Hypertelorism and inferior ocular dystopia was unacceptable after a change of 2mm. Hypotelorism and superior vertical dystopia was unacceptable after a change of 2.5mm. Ocular angulations of 5.5 degrees superiorly and 3.5 degrees inferiorly were unacceptable. Conclusions: Plastic surgeons, orthodontists, and lay people find specific facial asymmetries to be unacceptable at similar levels of deviation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25847
Appears in Collections:Master

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